SERVICES

We offer immigration legal services to the low-income Latino community, who have been victims of violent crimes within the United States. Our primary focus is gender-based crime survivors. However, we also offer services for survivors of other crime attacks.

PRESENTATIONS AND INFORMATION WORKSHOPS

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PRESENTATIONS AND INFORMATION WORKSHOPS

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PRESENTATIONS AND INFORMATION WORKSHOPS

The "Know Your Rights" program of talks and workshops focuses on daily presentations at different consulates, schools, churches, and community groups in the United States. Every day we speak directly to thousands of immigrants about their legal rights and the resources available to them in local communities.

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U-VISA

The U visa is a benefit for victims of certain crimes, who have suffered physical or mental abuse and who provide assistance to law enforcement agencies and government officials in the investigation or prosecution of criminal activities. After three years, people who receive a U visa can apply for a residence card or “Green Card”. The government issues a maximum of 10,000 U visas per year.

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VAWA

VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) is the Violence Against Women Act. Signed by President Bill Clinton in 1994, this law allowed immigrant victims of domestic violence to apply for immigration status without depending on their abuser. In 2000, the law created the U and T visa as the new forms of immigration benefits for victims of violent crimes and human trafficking. The law provides millions of dollars for the investigation and prosecution of violent crimes against women. In addition, this law also created the Office on Violence Against Women in the Department of Justice.

T-VISA

The T visa is for immigrants who are victims of human trafficking.

  • Forced labor: when a person is recruited, transported or housed to work by force, threatened or deceived. The result is that the person renders his services in a situation similar to that of slavery or involuntary servitude or debt.

  • Sexual exploitation: when a person under 18 years of age is induced to prostitute himself. And also when a person over that age is recruited, housed or transported and through fraud, coercion or force is forced into prostitution. That is, what is known as white trafficking.

SPECIAL IMMIGRANT JUVENILE STATUS - SIJS

SIJS helps undocumented children who have been abandoned, abused, or neglected to obtain special immigrant juvenile status (SIJS) and apply for permanent residence.

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Certain children who cannot be reunited with their parents can obtain permanent residency and can live and work permanently in the United States

SPECIAL IMMIGRANT JUVENILE STATUS - SIJS

SIJS helps undocumented children who have been abandoned, abused, or neglected to obtain special immigrant juvenile status (SIJS) and apply for permanent residence.

.

Certain children who cannot be reunited with their parents can obtain permanent residency and can live and work permanently in the United States

SPECIAL IMMIGRANT JUVENILE STATUS - SIJS

SIJS helps undocumented children who have been abandoned, abused, or neglected to obtain special immigrant juvenile status (SIJS) and apply for permanent residence.

.

Certain children who cannot be reunited with their parents can obtain permanent residency and can live and work permanently in the United States

SPECIAL IMMIGRANT JUVENILE STATUS - SIJS

SIJS helps undocumented children who have been abandoned, abused, or neglected to obtain special immigrant juvenile status (SIJS) and apply for permanent residence.

.

Certain children who cannot be reunited with their parents can obtain permanent residency and can live and work permanently in the United States

SPECIAL IMMIGRANT JUVENILE STATUS - SIJS

SIJS helps undocumented children who have been abandoned, abused, or neglected to obtain special immigrant juvenile status (SIJS) and apply for permanent residence.

.

Certain children who cannot be reunited with their parents can obtain permanent residency and can live and work permanently in the United States